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What Makes A Leader? (harvard Business Review Classics)

RRP $16.99

When asked to define the ideal leader, many would emphasize traits such as intelligence, toughness, determination, and vision—the qualities traditionally associated with leadership. Often left off the list are softer, more personal qualities—but they are also essential. Although a certain degree of analytical and technical skill is a minimum requirement for success, studies indicate that emotional intelligence may be the key attribute that distinguishes outstanding performers from those who are merely adequate. Psychologist and author Daniel Goleman first brought the term "emotional intelligence" to a wide audience with his 1995 book of the same name, and Goleman first applied the concept to business with a 1998 classic Harvard Business Review article. In his research at nearly 200 large, global companies, Goleman found that truly effective leaders are distinguished by a high degree of emotional intelligence. Without it, a person can have first-class training, an incisive mind, and an endless supply of good ideas, but he or she still won't be a great leader. The chief components of emotional intelligence—self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill—can sound unbusinesslike, but Goleman found direct ties between emotional intelligence and measurable business results.

The Harvard Business Review Classics series offers you the opportunity to make seminal Harvard Business Review articles a part of your permanent management library. Each highly readable volume contains a groundbreaking idea that continues to shape best practices and inspire countless managers around the world—and will have a direct impact on you today and for years to come.


Red Ocean Traps (harvard Business Review Classics)

RRP $16.99

As established markets become less profitable, companies increasingly need to find ways to create and capture new markets. Despite much investment and commitment, most firms struggle to do this. What, exactly, is getting in their way? The authors of the best-selling book Blue Ocean Strategy have spent over a decade exploring that question. They have seen that the trouble lies in managers' mental models—ingrained assumptions and theories about the way the world works. Though these models may work perfectly well in mature markets, they undermine executives' attempts to discover uncontested new spaces with ample potential (blue oceans) and keep companies firmly anchored in existing spaces where competition is bloody (red oceans). This article describes how to break free of these red ocean traps. To do that, managers need to: (1) Focus on attracting new customers, not pleasing current customers; (2) Worry less about segmentation and more about what different segments have in common; (3) Understand that market creation is not synonymous with either technological innovation or creative destruction; and (4) Stop focusing on premium versus low-cost strategies.

The Harvard Business Review Classics series offers you the opportunity to make seminal Harvard Business Review articles a part of your permanent management library. Each highly readable volume contains a groundbreaking idea that continues to shape best practices and inspire countless managers around the world—and will have a direct impact on you today and for years to come.


A Post-mortem Review

RRP $12.99

Many IT projects fail. Most of the failures are due to human error, misunderstanding, process problems and from time to time, technical gaffs. Root causes - systemic internalised practices that lead regularly to broken solutions - are analysed to find why what went wrong went wrong. A Post-Mortem Review presents a in-depth root-cause analysis study of a failed IT project that resulted in some customers arrested and others fired from jobs. The outcome had significant business and technical ramifications as a consequence. The case study presents a detailed and annotated interview with an executive who was involved in the project as well as a detailed analysis of it. Proposed solution opportunities are presented to address the root cause failures. There are so few documented post-mortem reviews that this will be a book to benefit any student studying project management at undergraduate or postgraduate level. It is astonishing how seemingly small things in an IT project that go unchecked can escalate into huge project failures before anyone notices. In this particular case, by the time they did notice, the damage had been done. The case study also makes use of goal and context modelling techniques in order to show how the opportunities for improvements could be represented to provide greater understanding in moving forwards from the project failure, and most importantly, learning from the mistakes made. Learn about the root cause analysis process, how to identify and classify impacts, symptoms, root causes and opportunities and how to structure a report to a client for this kind of investigative IT project.


Psychology For Business Success

RRP $502.99

This four-volume set uniquely integrates legislation, management theories, and social science research to cover a variety of human resource management topics, such as leadership and managerial styles, generational conflict in the workplace, techniques for evaluating employee performance, and workplace violence. In addition, best practices for policies, investigation procedures, and implementing training programs are covered-all information that can result in dramatic improvements in the workplace environment and business success. Every recommendation in this set is reflective of-as well as responsive to- the needs of employees. The overall objective of the work is to provide readers with effective management strategies to work strategically, ethically, honestly, and effectively with people. Additionally, the contents emphasize the importance of gaining an understanding of the strategic influences on managing people-for example, documenting the connections between business and psychological strategies like effective listening.


The Sabr Review Of Books: Volume 2

RRP $12.00

In this issue . . .

If experiencing the game of baseball were limited to actual participation or in-person attendance, the sport would mean much less to all of us that it does. Because we read about the game, we can enjoy it long after the fact, and in a whole new form: digested, chewed, analyzed, stat-icized. The electronic media have also played a big part - letting up "be there" for games many miles too far for a drive. This two-sided richness of enjoying baseball is at the two-sided center of this edition of The SABR Review of Books.

The SABR Review of Books is here to provide literary opinion, so we begin with a survey of a blue-ribbon panel of baseball writers and researchers, asking the question, "What books would constitute the essential baseball library?" We compiled the results and added the comments of the participants. What we got is an intriguing forum that sounds like a SABR bull session - full of savvy and conversation.

The recent release of several books on or about baseball broadcasting is the other main section of this issue. First is Curt Smith's magnum opus, Voices of the Game. It's the first full-scale history of broadcasters and broadcasting. Accompanying that review are views of books by two characters who played big roles themselves in Smith's book: Jack Brickhouse and Ernie Harwell. Joep Oppenheimer reviews the former, Jim O'Donnell the latter. Then we asked videophile and sports broadcaster himself, Bill Borst, to review the baseball videos now available.

Baseball's literary legacy is much more than histories and narratives. It has spawned major works in both fiction and poetry. Yet while the wedding between baseball and poetry has been fruitful, baseball fiction often leaves an unfulfilled feeling. Why is that? We asked Luke Salisburgy, who has tackled the challenge of writing baseball fiction himself, why it's so goshdarned tough to do well. Poet Ira Stone provides us with a "Mediation" on the linkage of baseball and poetry, advising that "These poets did not seek to write about baseball. . . . These poets surprised themselves in creating poems wrapped in the mythology of baseball . . ."

Comparisons seem to be at the heart of nearly any baseball discussion, so it's only fair that two articles in this issue start with that premise. Adie Suehsdorf reviews Say It Ain't So, Joe and One Last Round for the Shuffler, two works that treat similar baseball characters: one a legend for his faults, the other barely a memory. For the first issue of The SABR Review Frank Phelps was asked to review Anton Grobani's Baseball Biography, and he did, but between contribution and publication, we got word of a "new and better" bibliography, this one by Myron Smith. So we asked Frank to review it. The result is a side-by-side comparison of the two. Must reading for baseball bibliophiles.

Always fascinating are those behind-the-scenes looks at the game that go beyond clubhouse chatter, into the worlds of power and prestige. Merritt Clifton analyzes what the notorious Bowie Kuhn said about himself in Hardball, and Don Warfield's book on Larry MacPhail is discussed by Philip Bergen.

This issue's "personal favorite" feature looks lovingly at Pitching in a Pinch, by Christy Mathewson. Rob Johnson even explains how he spent years searching for a copy of it he could call his own. And we all know that feeling.

But that's far from all: we have reviews of Joe Durso's Baseball and the American Dream, by Darrell Berger; Pete Cava on The Dixie Association; Lawrence Rubin squares off with The Sporting News on their "Fifty Greatest Games"; Glenn Stout discusses Maury Allen's Maris; and more.



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