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Blue Ocean Leadership (harvard Business Review Classics)

RRP $16.99

Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this book, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"—that is, the people managers oversee and report to—are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets.

The Harvard Business Review Classics series offers you the opportunity to make seminal Harvard Business Review articles a part of your permanent management library. Each highly readable volume contains a groundbreaking idea that continues to shape best practices and inspire countless managers around the world—and will have a direct impact on you today and for years to come.


Get Rid Of The Performance Review!

RRP $49.99

Based upon a startling article in the Wall Street Journal that appeared in November, 2008, Dr. Sam Culbert, a professor at the prestigious UCLA Anderson School of Business and an expert on human relations in the workplace, summarized what most of us have already known for years - that annual corporate performance appraisals not only don't work, they actually cause more problems than they solve.

In this powerful book, Culbert, with his co-writer Larry Rout, a long-time editor at the Wall Street Journal, pinpoints how performance reviews destroy employee morale, are rarely helpful, vary widely from one manager to the next, and in short, actually have a negative impact on both the supervisor and his/her subordinate. Plus they give rise to emotional friction between the two individuals that often can't be repaired.

By using real-life examples of how performance reviews are botched, screwed up, and get in their own way, Culbert make a strong case as to why performance reviews should be totally revised, or thrown on the corporate scrap heap.

Culbert then provides the solution: instead of performance reviews, he strongly advocates the adoption of performancepreviews. In effect, managers and bosses should address key issues in their subordinate's performance when those problems pop up right away -- not at the end of the year. Performance previews work.

Full of common sense, along with real passion, this book confronts one of the long-standing traditions in management/employee relationship and advocates strongly for immediate change.


What Makes A Leader? (harvard Business Review Classics)

RRP $16.99

When asked to define the ideal leader, many would emphasize traits such as intelligence, toughness, determination, and vision—the qualities traditionally associated with leadership. Often left off the list are softer, more personal qualities—but they are also essential. Although a certain degree of analytical and technical skill is a minimum requirement for success, studies indicate that emotional intelligence may be the key attribute that distinguishes outstanding performers from those who are merely adequate. Psychologist and author Daniel Goleman first brought the term "emotional intelligence" to a wide audience with his 1995 book of the same name, and Goleman first applied the concept to business with a 1998 classic Harvard Business Review article. In his research at nearly 200 large, global companies, Goleman found that truly effective leaders are distinguished by a high degree of emotional intelligence. Without it, a person can have first-class training, an incisive mind, and an endless supply of good ideas, but he or she still won't be a great leader. The chief components of emotional intelligence—self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill—can sound unbusinesslike, but Goleman found direct ties between emotional intelligence and measurable business results.

The Harvard Business Review Classics series offers you the opportunity to make seminal Harvard Business Review articles a part of your permanent management library. Each highly readable volume contains a groundbreaking idea that continues to shape best practices and inspire countless managers around the world—and will have a direct impact on you today and for years to come.


How To Build A Van Conversion Business (special Edition)

RRP $18.99

In clear, easy-to-grasp language, the author covers many of the topics that you will need to know in order to launch and run a successful business venture.


Lesions Of Cervix - A Review

RRP $14.99



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