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A Short History Of Scotland

RRP $15.99

Andrew Lang (31 March 1844 - 20 July 1912) was a Scots poet, novelist, literary critic, and contributor to the field of anthropology. He is best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales. The Andrew Lang lectures at the University of St Andrews are named after him. Lang was born in Selkirk. He was the eldest of the eight children born to John Lang, the town clerk of Selkirk, and his wife Jane Plenderleath Sellar, who was the daughter of Patrick Sellar, factor to the first duke of Sutherland. On 17 April 1875, he married Leonora Blanche Alleyne, youngest daughter of C. T. Alleyne of Clifton and Barbados. She was (or should have been) variously credited as author, collaborator, or translator of Lang's Color/Rainbow Fairy Books which he edited. He was educated at Selkirk Grammar School, Loretto, and at the Edinburgh Academy, St Andrews University and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he took a first class in the final classical schools in 1868, becoming a fellow and subsequently honorary fellow of Merton College. He soon made a reputation as one of the most able and versatile writers of the day as a journalist, poet, critic, and historian. In 1906, he was elected FBA. He died of angina pectoris at the Tor-na-Coille Hotel in Banchory, Banchory, survived by his wife. He was buried in the cathedral precincts at St Andrews.


A History Of Banking In Antebellum America

RRP $44.99

Previous banking histories have focused on the money supply function of early American banks and its connection to the recurrent boom-bust cycle of the antebellum era. This history focuses on the credit generating function of American banks It demonstrates that banks aggressively promoted development rather than passively followed its course. Using previously unexploited data, Professor Bodenhorn shows that banks helped to advance the development of incipient industrialization. Additionally, he shows that banks formed long-distance relationships that promoted geographic capital mobility, thereby assuring that short-term capital was directed in socially desirable directions, that is, where it was most in demand. He then traces those institutional and legal developments that allowed for this capital mobility. The result was that America was served by an efficient system of financial intermediaries by the mid-nineteenth century.


A Renegade History Of The United States

RRP $60.00

In this groundbreaking book, noted historian Thaddeus Russell tells a new and surprising story about the origins of American freedom. Rather than crediting the standard textbook icons, Russell demonstrates that it was those on the fringes of society whose subversive lifestyles helped legitimize the taboo and made America the land of the free.

In vivid portraits of renegades and their 'respectable' adversaries, Russell shows that the nation's history has been driven by clashes between those interested in preserving social order and those more interested in pursuing their own desires - insiders versus outsiders, good citizens versus bad. The more these accidental revolutionaries existed, resisted, and persevered, the more receptive society became to change. Russell brilliantly and vibrantly argues that it was history's iconoclasts who established many of our most cherished liberties.

Russell finds these pioneers of personal freedom in the places that usually go unexamined - saloons and speakeasies, brothels and gambling halls, and even behind the Iron Curtain. He introduces a fascinating array of antiheroes: drunken workers who created the weekend; prostitutes who set the precedent for women's liberation; criminals who pioneered racial integration and brazen homosexuals who broke open America's sexual culture.

This is not history that can be found in textbooks - it is a highly original and provocative portrayal of the American past as it has never been written before.

About The Author

Thaddeus Russell teaches history and American Studies at Occidental College and has taught at Columbia University, Barnard College, Eugene Lang College, and the New School for Social Research. Born and raised in Berkeley, California, he graduated from Antioch College and received a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University. His first book, Out of the Jungle: Jimmy Hoffa and the Re-Making of the American Working Class , was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 2001. He is a frequent contributor to the Daily Beast and has published articles in New York Magazine, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor, Salon, and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, as well as scholarly essays in American Quarterly and the Columbia History of Post-World War II America. He has also appeared on the History Channel and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.


Credit Risk Securitisation

RRP $271.99

Credit risk has become the central focus of risk management in the last decade for a num ber of reasons. First, for a typical continental bank, credit risk is still the predominant risk category. Second, the new Basel Capital Accord of June 2004 allows for more advanced methods to assess the risk related with a bank's credit portfolio. Third, the markets to reallocate credit risk between agents experience the highest growth rate of all derivative markets. Fourth, from a theoretical and an empirical point of view, the modelling and valuation of credit risk is a more demanding problem than the analysis of market risk. Especially, the appropriate modelling of correlation effects, e.g. the correlation between defaults of different creditors or between default probabilities and recovery rates, is'still not satisfactory resolved. Collateralised Debt Obligations (CDOs) represent important derivatives to synthesise and reallocate the risk of banks' credit portfolios. These instruments are of specific interest as they, first, call for a determination of the whole loss distribution of a credit portfolio and not only for a few moments. Second and even more interesting, this loss distribution is carved into senior, mezzanine and junior tranches according to the needs and risk attitudes of the bank and the market."


Public History For A Digital Age

RRP $341.99

Public History for a Digital Age addresses the selection, presentation, maintenance, collection, and archiving of digital assets. In this work, Mark Tebeau discusses how digital curation establishes, maintains, and adds value to repositories of digital data for present and future use.

The challenge of engaging publics in historical interpretation is one of the most enduring problems for historians across the spectrum of practice: in museums, the academy, National Parks, classrooms, and communities themselves. This text focuses on how the digital revolution has transformed how we produce, consume, represent, and imagine the historical endeavor. It also discusses how we theorize knowledge itself, including how we conceive of and interact with "publics."

The dynamic intersection of public history and digital humanities has transformed both public history and digital humanities. In this book, Tebeau uses both the theory and practice of the "Curator" as a lens through which to understand this dynamic era. By exploring the shifting terrain of curation across multiple domains of practice,Public History for a Digital Age reveals how digital concepts and emerging technologies are reframing the theory and practice of public history.



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